This chemical is most commonly used as topical and local anesthetics. Allergic reactions to lidocaine are usually rare. This chemical may cross react with other amide caines such as dibucaine, carbocaine, and prilocaine.








Please be aware that if your spouse or significant other uses topical skin care products that contain this chemical, skin-to-skin transfer may occur to you.

It may take 2 to 3 weeks of avoiding exposure before improvement of your eruption begins.

Inform your primary care physician of your allergy.

Other names you may see this chemical listed as:
  2-(Diethylamino)-N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)acetamide
  2-Diethylamino-2,6-acetoxylidide
  w-Diethylamino-2,6-dimethylacetanilide
  Lignocaine
  Xylocaine
  Xylotox
  Leostesin
  Rucaina
  Isicaine
  Cuivasal
  Duncaine
  Sylestesin
  Anestacon
  Gravocain
  Lidothesin
  Xylocitin
  Xylestesin










Lidocaine
 
 
 
Contact Allergy Links
Where is it found?
What is it?
Hints on avoiding:
Anesthetic topical
Dental injection
Injectable local anesthetic
Suppositories

Contact Allergen Database

This information is provided as educational only and is
not intended to substitute for medical care or recommendations by a physician.
 
Dibucaine
Carbocaine
Prilocaine





Possible cross-reactions may occur with other chemicals: